The Dyson Pure Cool Link Tower Review

ReviewsDevin Balentina

purifiertowerreview (4)

Take the Dyson AM07 Tower Fan and the AM06 Desk Fan, add a glass HEPA filter, Wi-Fi capability to control it remotely via an app and you get their new air purifier fans. This duo and the 360 eye robot vacuum cleaner are Dyson’s first foray into the smart device category. Adding smart features and connectivity to their devices is a big change for a company like Dyson, which traditionally have favored simplicity, durability and design over complexity and tons of features. Has the shift to smart all-in-one, connected device been a smooth one for Dyson or should they have stayed true to their more traditional roots? And Is a Pure Cool Link really better than an AM07 Tower Fan?

Specifications

Dyson_Pure_Cool_Link_Shop_Silver_Tower

Dyson Pure Cool Link (Tower)

·      

Air Amplification

      Yes

Airflow settings

       Fully variable

Amp Diameter    

  •    7.4 inches – 190mm

Weight

•   8.4lbs – 3.7kg

Price

•   €579   $499 

Oscillation

•    90 degree span

Base Diameter/with Plate

        7.7 inches inches – 196mm

Performance

        41.4l/s 109g/s

Colorways

      White/Silver – Iron/Blue

Cord length

        6.6ft – 1.8m

 

The Dyson Pure Cool Link Tower

purifiertowerreview (54)

This new duo is filled to the brim with features and this is clearly reflected on the extremely long name: Dyson Pure Cool Link (PCL). “Cool” reflects the device’s ability to function as a fan and is usually given to Dyson’s fan range of devices. “Pure” echoes the device’s ability to purify the air, while “Link” basically means that it’s a connected and smart device. Personally I’m not a fan of the name, as it’s way too long and complicated, doesn’t roll off the tongue and it simply isn’t a name you’d remember. Dyson Purifier, Purifier connect or Purifier link would have been better choices.

Dyson Purifier, Purifier connect or Purifier link would have been better choices

purifiertowerreview (65)

purifiertowerreview (67)

The purifier comes in two sizes: the larger tower and the compact table version, with a selection of Iron/Blue and White/Silver colorways. Typically, these products launch with a choice of two to three colors, with more options added further down the line. Judging by their current lineup of fans it’s safe to say that a Black and a Silver/Grey version should follow further down the line. We would also like to see a limited edition see-through model. As is expected from Dyson’s products, this new duo doesn’t come cheap, a whopping €579/$499 for the tower and €499 for the desk version. Dyson have decided not to release the desk version in the US, which is why we only have the price in euros.

purifiertowerreview (66)

The new purifier series is basically two devices in one. At their core, the tower is essentially an AM07 while the desk version an AM06 with the addition of an air purifier. This added function also signifies a slight dip in performance when compared the performance of their standalone fan. This is something we’ve come to expected from Dyson’s all-in-one devices. Take for example their heaters and humidifiers (which can also function as fans) and compare them to their equivalent fan-only versions and the latter always performs better when it comes to pushing air. This time around there’s only a slight difference when you compare the Pure Cool Link Tower to the AM07 it’s based on. It will push air at a rate of 500liter/3 meters per second, while the tower purifier is able to push 414 liters at speed of 2.58m per second. This small difference in performance won’t be noticeable in the real world and is the first time Dyson has managed to create a two-in-one device that performs at the level of their stand-alone fans.

Strangely missing is a pedestal purifier, basically the purifier version of the AM08. Dyson’s fans traditionally have been available in three versions: desk, tower and pedestal, with the pedestal being their highest performing flagship fan. While the tower shape looks stunning, I’ve always had a soft spot for the pedestal which is basically a large version of the desk fan with a bigger amp sitting on a long pedestal. When asked, the Dyson rep had no clear reason why a pedestal version of the purifier couldn’t be made, but hinted at the difficulty of implementing the purifier in the pedestal shape. Fact is, the pedestal looks unique, I haven’t seen any other manufacturer use this form factor and it even outperforms the tower version, two important reasons why Dyson should make a pedestal version.

purifiertowerreview (34)

purifiertowerreview (69)

Fact is, the pedestal looks unique, I haven’t seen any other manufacturer use this form factor and it even outperforms the tower version, two important reasons why Dyson should make a pedestal version.

Besides the Wi-Fi, remote control capabilities via the app and the additional sensors, that extra 180 dollars (when compared to the AM07 fan’s $319 price) gets you a 360-degree glass HEPA Filter. The filter can be used for about 4500 hours or about a year, assuming the fan is running 12 hours a day. When it does needs to be replaced it will set you back $69.99/€64,90, a fair price for a filter that should last you at least a year. Just be aware that after paying that hefty $499 price, you’ll still need to buy new filters every year, something that can be a deal breaker for some.

After paying that hefty $499 price, you’ll still need to buy new filters every year

purifiertowerreview (70)

According to Dyson it gets rid of about “99.95% of allergens and pollutants as small as 0.1 microns from the air,” this also means that odors are removed, which is something I didn’t expect.  We’ll have a look at how effective this filter is in the performance section. What I can say here is that I love that the app keeps tracks of how many hours the filter has been used and will inform you when it needs to the be replaced. For those that want to keep it simple and don’t want to use the app, the fan itself will also give warning when this has to be done.

purifiertowerreview (68)

So how does it work? Like all their previous fans, heaters and humidifiers, Dyson’s own bladeless fan design is not only used to spread the purified air, but it also draws air towards the unit. It uses Air Multiplier technology to efficiently produce airflow: a fraction of the air generated by Dyson Air Multiplier fans actually passes through the impeller/filter at the bottom, most of the airflow results from the inducement and entrainment of surrounding air in and through the amplifier at the top.  It basically takes surrounding air via the openings in the base and pushes it out at high speed through a slot that runs along the sides of the loop called the Amplifier. The magic happens once the air streams out where it encounters a curved surface, which naturally creates negative air pressure. The effect is similar to curved wing of an airplane. This pressure causes the outgoing air to accelerate while drawing even more air from the back. As the air travels down the expanding loop, it creates another area of low pressure behind the fan which again naturally pushes even more air through the fan and causing the air in front of it to accelerate even faster. Lastly as the air exits the fan as a large cylinder of air that comes of the edge, more air is added through a process called viscous shearing. Dyson’s approach is simply genius and efficient in the sense that the fan is designed in such a way to naturally create low pressure areas, basically using the laws of physics to accelerate the air, drawing in more air from the back with very little initial effort. This low pressure that promotes airflow towards the unit is perfect in the case of an air purifier, because it will ensure that all the air in the room will be pushed towards the fan and treated. The result is an extremely efficient and effective purifier. The concept is pure brilliance!

Lately I’ve been looking at various indoor weather modules like the Netatmo Weather Station and Foobot to monitor indoor air quality, temperature, humidity and weather. These are pretty expensive devices that range from $150 to $300, so I was surprised to find that the PCL not only  monitors indoor air quality, but can also tell you the indoor temperature, humidty and current weather via the included app.  The unit has sensors that can monitor this data, which is major plus that makes those products unnecessary if you own the Pure Cool Link. Missing however is the ability to detect Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide levels, something I think Dyson should consider.

I was surprised to find that the PCL not only  monitors indoor air quality, but can also tell you the indoor temperature, humidty and current weather via the included app.

Design

purifiertowerreview (58)

purifiertowerreview (35)

purifiertowerreview (4)

purifiertowerreview (9)

Design-wise, the unit is stunning with a very elegant and commanding presence. It basically takes the basic shape of the AM07 and goes for a wider main body, making the base obsolete. The base was this rounded platform that prevented the AM07 from toppling over due to its thin main body. However, at first sight one could easily mistake the PCL for an AM07, but a closer look reveals a chunkier, wider silhouette that lacks the rounded base.

purifiertowerreview (47)

purifiertowerreview (48)

It also takes the updated design language we’ve seen with the Dyson Humidifier, but drops the see-through canister for a perforated metal basket, giving it a bold and modern statement.

purifiertowerreview (12)

purifiertowerreview (57)

purifiertowerreview (7)

This refreshed design which it shares with the Humidifier is all about an exaggerated and oversized main body that flows into the amp and a bolder overall design with crisper lines. The AM07 had a more subdued design with softer lines that emphasized the loop and silhouette, this time around they’ve put more emphasis on the body. This doesn’t come as a surprise as the unit’s key feature rests right there. This design element also visually emphasizes where air enters the unit and also emphasizes the device’s ability to purify the air. The rest of the unit also has crisper, flowing lines and deeper curves. A prime example of this is the bottom of the amp which has flowy lines that cut deep into the base. The amplifier also sits deeper within the body when compared to the AM07, with the body almost wrapping around the amp, seamlessly integrating the two parts.

purifiertowerreview (18)

purifiertowerreview (20)

Dyson is known to create beautiful pieces of tech, but the Pure Cool Link just took it to the next level and is their best looking design to date, yet instantly recognizable as a Dyson with a very iconic silhouette. If you’re looking for a fan and you value design, especially where modern design is concerned, your search should stop right here. Its design stands out, yet versatile enough to be able to blend in and looks great in just about any interior décor. When we reviewed the AM10, I wrote that I: “could easily remove the cord and the AM10 could double as modern piece of art.” The same holds true for the Pure Cool Link, but due to its height it’s an even more impressive.  And just like the AM10, If you do get one, be prepared for it to be quiet the conversation piece. Friends and family either ask what it is, comment on how great it looks and are equally impressed by the concept of a bladeless fan. I’ve also had many visitors asking if they could stick their hand through the loop, bewildered by the fact that they couldn’t figure out how the fan was producing air so much air. There was no doubt that Dyson made the best looking fans on the market, the Pure Cool Link simply reaffirmed this.

There was no doubt that Dyson made the best looking fans on the market, the Pure Cool Link simply reaffirmed this.

purifiertowerreview (7)

When comparing the design of the tower to the desk version, I’d say if space is important, the taller tower version will take less space with its slender design when compared to the shorter but wider desk purifier, all while also outperforming it. Strangely, neither of the units can tilt point the amp upwards or downwards. While both fans can produce a very wide column of air, Dyson has produced fan or heaters that tilt the amp. This a feature we would like to see in the future.

Strangely, neither of the units can tilt point the amp upwards or downwards.

purifiertowerreview (63)

purifiertowerreview (62)

The unit consists of 4 parts: the amp, the filter, the metal basket and the body that houses the impeller, Wi-Fi module and other sensors.

purifiertowerreview (31)

purifiertowerreview (32)

purifiertowerreview (33)

One complaint I had with previous fans was the inability to take the unit apart and clean it on the inside. As air and dust was sucked into those models, the dust collected on the inside with no way of cleaning the innards of the fan. This posed a potential allergy problem and also meant that with time the unit would become less efficient due to the dust clogging the openings and collecting around the impeller. The PCL solves this problem in two ways. Firstly, the entire unit can be taken apart which allows you to a clean a large part on inside, save for the motor, impeller and electric parts which are not user-accessible.  But perhaps the most important change is the HEPA filter. All air that gets pushed into the unit will have to go through this filter and as a result dust will be stopped and collected into the filter. One look inside the unit reveals that it’s completely dust free, even after using the unit for a few months.

The PCL solves this problem in two ways. Firstly, the entire unit can be taken apart which allows you to a clean a large part on inside, save for the motor, impeller and electric parts which are not user-accessible.  But perhaps the most important change is the HEPA filter.

purifiertowerreview (11)

purifiertowerreview (55)

purifiertowerreview (25)

purifiertowerreview (26)

The amp has a Glossy White finish on the outside and has a matte Silver finish on the inside, giving adding some contrast to the mostly White fan and matches the metal basket. It can be detached from the base by pressing two buttons on the side of the amp. It’s sturdy enough not to flex when you apply a bit of force to it, yet light enough to be lifted with a single finger.

It’s sturdy enough not to flex when you apply a bit of force to it, yet light enough to be lifted with a single finger

purifiertowerreview (45)

purifiertowerreview (45)

purifiertowerreview (27)

purifiertowerreview (50)

purifiertowerreview (58)

purifiertowerreview (17)

purifiertowerreview (16)

purifiertowerreview (43)

It also attaches to the unit with two satisfying clicks, one for each button, audibly letting you know that it’s securely connected to the body. Like before, the remote can magnetically attach to the top of the amp, a clever and elegant solution. However, I don’t like that they’re still using disposable batteries.  I would love to see a remote with rechargeable that uses inductive charging when placed on the top of the amp or a simpler solution in the form of a USB cable. Since the remote uses very little power, a quick recharge once a year would be enough. Dyson could build the USB cable into a compartment and you could attach the remote for a quick recharge. No matter what route they go for, the disposable battery has to go! When we reviewed the AM02 we noticed that the IR receiver sits to close to the ground. The same holds true for the PCL. When the unit is placed on one side of my bed and I try to control it, the receiver would often be blocked. Dyson Should consider adding a second receiver in the amp or use either RF or Bluetooth which don’t require a line of site. Lastly, they should also consider adding backlit button the remote.

No matter what route they go for, the disposable battery has to go!

purifiertowerreview (3)

purifiertowerreview (24)

purifiertowerreview (34)

purifiertowerreview (38)

The filter sits inside the perforated metal basket and the two can slide into place around the base. I love that both can easily be taken apart and the metal basket can easily be cleaned.

purifiertowerreview (8)

purifiertowerreview (21)

purifiertowerreview (61)

purifiertowerreview (41)

purifiertowerreview (42)

purifiertowerreview (30)

The body itself houses the impeller, the many sensors, the Wi-Fi unit and has a black color on the inside. The lower part of the body which is the only part that can be seen when the basket/filter are in place has a matching glossy White color. It houses the power button and the LED display. The display uses a White color that nicely matches the glossy White and is able to display two large numbers and various small icons around. I also like the fact that the display can be dimmed. This was a complaint we had when we tested to Humidifier and we’re happy that Dyson addressed this so quickly.

I also like the fact that the display can be dimmed. This was a complaint we had when we tested to Humidifier and we’re happy that Dyson addressed this so quickly.

purifiertowerreview (40)

purifiertowerreview (39)

On the back, the base houses the power cord which unlike the Humidifier sadly cannot be removed. When not plugged in the cable just sits there. We would have loved retractable cable that can be stowed in the body, similar to some of their vacuum cleaners. This is in no way a deal breaker, but when it comes to design this is the only real complaint I can think of. On the back there’s tiny hatch that protects the sensors behind it.

To summarize, the Pure Cool Link is almost perfect and from a design point of view  it looks better than the AM07. We’re happy that it dropped that awkward base and we love that the fact that the LED display can be dimmed. Perhaps it greatest design advantage is the fact that unit can be fully opened and cleaned on the inside and the addition of a filter, keeps the inside dust free, addressing a huge complaint we had with their previous fans. We feel that should have used a rechargeable remote by now and we would have loved a retractable. Even so, the Pure Cool Link is almost perfect.

Perhaps it greatest design advantage is the fact that unit can be fully opened and cleaned on the inside and the addition of a filter, keeps the inside dust free

The App

purecooltowerapp (12)

purecooltowerapp (2)

The Pure Cool Link and the 360 eye are Dyson’s first connected and app powered devices. This means you can fully control the Purifier with your smartphone or app from your local Wi-Fi or across the globe using a Wi-Fi or mobile connections. Despite being their first app, it’s surprisingly stable, fast, simple and beautifully done, typical Dyson with simplicity at its core. I haven’t had any crashes while using the Android version and Dyson have steadily been pushing frequent updates, although they’ve been silent on what these updates fix or what new features are being added. This is something that they should start doing. One look at the app and it becomes clear that the emphasis is clearly on the visual side of things with an appealing design that uses pastel colors, soft lines, large buttons and text. Overall it’s aesthetically pleasing and exudes simplicity. The folks at Dyson have somehow managed to translate everything that is instantly recognizable into an app, with an overall pleasant experience.

purecooltowerapp (22)

While the Pure Cool Link can be used without ever needing a smartphone, it becomes a totally different beast when you do. The main screen gives you information on the conditions indoors as well as the outdoor readings in your current city. The handy indoor data like air quality, temperature and humidity are directly being measured by the PCL itself, while a third party is used for the outdoor data. This separates the PCL from many home weather stations which have an indoor module as well as an external module to directly measure the conditions outside. As result, the outdoor measurements will generally be more accurate with weather stations that have dedicated hardware placed outside. I don’t expect Dyson to include this kind of hardware or accuracy for the outdoor data, it is however a big bonus that they’ve decided do included this info. In the future I would love if they could include weather forecast in the app. Another nice touch is the use of colors to indicate the air quality indoor/outdoors, going from Green, Yellow, Orange, Red and Purple (which indicates  extremely bad air quality.) I’m extremely excited that Dyson included the ability for the fan to monitor not only air quality, but also other data that would require weather stations/air monitors like the Netatmo and Foobot, which is a major plus.  Like I said before, I would love that future iteration can also measure Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide levels.

While the Pure Cool Link can be used without ever needing a smartphone, it becomes a totally different beast when you do

purecooltowerapp (19)

The app also replicates every single functionality of the remote, with the controls placed vertically. Staying through to the “simple” and “visual” theme they should consider adding a virtual version of the remote instead of controls placed vertically which should make it much easier to use. In our “first look” of the Pure Cool link I wrote that: “One of my  complaint so far is the large area of the app dedicated to a demo. They should completely replace this with a button that takes a small percentage of the overall space.  My other complaint so far has been when switching modes from On, Auto to Off. You basically need to scroll sideways to the desired mode and let go, but at first this wasn’t obvious. I instinctively wanted to scroll and select the option I wanted, which simply won’t work. I would prefer a system where all the modes are displayed and you’re able to simply select the mode you want which in turn would light up.” Dyson has addressed both issue with the latest updates.  Changing modes or fan speed is now a matter of scrolling and selecting. The app also doesn’t start in demo mode, but with a visual overview of air quality. All we need now is that virtual remote for the controls which would make the app even more simple to use.

purecooltowerapp (20)

purecooltowerapp (21)

There are also nice graphs to show you certain trends, including a daily and weekly look at air quality, temperature range, average humidity and filter life.

purecooltowerapp (3)

A handy schedule function that allows you to automatically turn the unit on and off is also available. If you use this unit especially in your bedroom and expect to go to bed by 11 pm and wake up around 8am, you could set to start purifying the air at 10pm and automatically turn off at 8 when you wake up.

purecooltowerapp (4)

There’s a section to select and control various units, especially when you have a unit in each room and a demo mode give a rundown of all the basic features and functions.

purecooltowerapp (1)

purecooltowerapp (7)

purecooltowerapp (8)

purecooltowerapp (9)

purecooltowerapp (10)

The settings menu gives handy maintenance options like software update, monitor the filter life, turning continuous air monitoring on or off, your air quality target and your location for the outdoor data. The app is also a must for the software updates that enhance performance or add new features. I was extremely impressed when I got a notification that my Pure Cool Link had been updated to the latest software version, which at the time of writing is version 21.02.04.

When I heard Dyson was releasing  a Wi-Fi connected device, I naturally thought of IFTT or If This Than That, a helpful app that ties all your connected devices to a single app that makes home automation easy. I envisioned how I could use Amazon’s Echo to control my Dyson or how a Nest thermostat would be able to activate the Purifier if the temperature rises above a certain level. Sadly, the Purifier doesn’t offer IFTT support or any home automation standard for that matter and there’s no word on when or if it’s coming. If I had to ask for one specific feature, this would be it. When it comes to home automation, this feature could make or break a product, especially when it comes to tech enthusiasts. This is my biggest gripe and the one reason I can’t give the Pure Cool Link a perfect score.

To summarize, the is stable, fast, simple and beautifully done with frequent updates. It gives you the same options you get the on the remote and does a lot more. Dyson has addressed my complaints I addressed in my “First Look” which testimony to how frequent they update the app. I would prefer an onscreen virtual remote instead of the controls placed vertically. My biggest complaint however is the lack of using open standards like IFTT, which prevents the Pure Cool Link from getting a perfect score. The app however is a solid first attempt coming from Dyson.

I would prefer an onscreen virtual remote instead of the controls placed vertically

My biggest complaint however is the lack of using open standards like IFTT, which prevents the Pure Cool Link from getting a perfect score.

Setup

As we said before, you could use the Pure Cool Link without ever touching a smartphone. In that case it’s simply a matter of plugging it in, turning it on and the rest is done using the remote. But it’s full potential can only be achieved if you use the app. As with most connected device an account  is needed but this can be done in  few minutes. By pressing and holding the power button for about 10 to 20 seconds the system will enter some sort of “pairing mode” indicated by the flashing green Wi-Fi icon. The app will instruct you to choose your network’s Wi-Fi name (SSID) and its password. Lastly you’ll need to enter your Pure Cool Link’s Wi-Fi password. This password is unique to every unit and can be found on the unit itself in the form of a sticker on the front of the body, on the manual and on your purifier, located underneath the filter. I quickly removed the stick as it takes away from the beautiful design and even if you lose the manual a sticker, I’m happy that Dyson has also placed the password on a location you’re not likely to lose the it. Important to note that the system use the 2.4 GHz frequency. I had some issues during the setup due to my network using both 2.4 and 5 GHz and my phone being connected to the 5GHz frequency. This caused the app to continuously try to connect the PCL to a 5Ghz signal which it of course couldn’t see. This resulted in the system unable to get an internet connection and the setup process to fail. It was only until I switched to the 2.4Ghz connection did it all work. A mix of 2.4/5 GHz frequencies  are common with modern routers, while the latest smartphones can use the 5Ghz frequency which will result in the setup process failing. Dyson should warn the consumer about this fact during setup or somehow enable the app to detect that a 5GHz frequency is being used, as most consumer wouldn’t even know the difference between 2.4 and 5 GHz. Another way to solve this is by giving the Pure Cool Link both 2.4 and 5 GHz support. Other than a small bump caused by the lack of 5 GHz support, the setup process was quite easy. Dyson should address this as soon as possible as it could lead consumers to think that they have a faulty unit.

Performance and Daily Use

purifiertowerreview (55)

I was skeptical about the advertised purifying capabilities, but within a few days of using the device I was convinced. Being allergic to dust and pollen, I usually have a stuffy nose and itchy eyes in the summer. I started a routine of having the purifier in the bedroom at night and in the living room during the day, basically running all day in automatic mode. This mode allows the device to monitor the air quality and will automatically turn on, adjust the fan speed and even enter a sleep mode to conserve power, all based on the current air quality. In some cases, where the room was dusty or right after putting on some perfume in my bedroom, the purifier (in the living room) was sensitive enough to detect this and would automatically turn on and purify the air and automatically turn off after less particles were detected. Not only have I noticed a dramatic drop in overall dust around the house, but I don’t wake up with itchy eyes or a stuffy nose. As someone who’s allergic to dust and pollen, the PCL has had a dramatic effect to the point that I can’t go back to a fan that doesn’t have a HEPA filter.

The PCL has had a dramatic effect to the point that I can’t go back to a fan that doesn’t have a HEPA filter

purifiertowerreview (36)

I’ve also decided to test it after doing some cooking. Within half an hour the purifier had cleared the room of most odors, something that usually would have taken hours after opening the windows, another reason why I’ve come to love the automatic mode. The fan would automatically turn on, do its job and then silently return to it slumber. The number of particles has a direct effect on the fan speed when the fan automatically turns on. When I just used some perfume, the fan can go from silent to blasting at full speed, which can be startling at first and something which needed some getting used to in the beginning, but after a while you get used to the idea. Simply put, the Pure Cool Link is very sensitive and incredibly effective at not only clearing particles but also odors.

Within half an hour the purifier had cleared the room of most odors

purifiertowerreview (44)

If you’ve used previous Dyson fans before, the Pure Cool Link basically remains the same, save for a few refinements here and there that make it even more silent. While Dyson no longer the air amplification numbers, we can deduce the performance levels based on previous models. The AM03 which has now been replaced by the AM08 are rated at 18X, the AM02 which has been replaced by the AM07 and the PCL Tower and all sit at about 16X air amplification, while the desk-based AM01 models are able to amplify the air at 15x, similar to the AM06 and PCL Desk. This puts the PCL tower slightly below the AM07 and the desk slightly below the AM06.

purifiertowerreview (23)

Just like before the tower impresses with the surprising amount air it’s able to generate and its remarkable ability of producing a very consistent and smooth column of air, all while remaining very quiet.  Similarly-sized traditional fans simply fall short when it comes down to actually keeping things cool and providing smooth air flow. On extremely hot days, these traditional fans simply feel like they’re just blowing that very same warm air. I’ve also noticed that they tend to have a drying effect on the skin and eyes and they also produce lots of turbulence that reaches you in a very inconsistent manner. The PCL on the other hand produces a wide, ultra-smooth and consistent column of air that has an effect similar to a strong and constant sea breeze. It’s just one even wall of air that’s also surprisingly effective when it comes down to cooling you down on those extremely hot days. Dyson fans are able to produce a lot of air even when set at their lowest performance setting. In fact, the effect is even more convincing  at those lower fan speeds as the fan is barely producing any noise, the air doesn’t seem to be coming from the fan and the effect is similar to a breeze. While, performance is on par with what Dyson has done before with their tower fans, the PCL has had some clear refinements which translates to less noise. The fan speed ranges from 1 to 10 with the fan remaining extremely quiet up to 7, anything higher and the noise levels increase dramatically and produces. At speeds above 7, there is significantly more air coming out of the fan, but this doesn’t necessarily provide more cooling which is why I almost never use it at those speeds.

An effect similar to a strong and constant sea breeze

purifiertowerreview (10)

Despite the striking design of the unit, visiting friends and family are even more impressed when it comes to the actual performance of the fan, commenting on the unusually smooth continuous flow of air. Even more impressive is the fact that it can do this when placed several feet away, making it ideal for larger rooms.

Conclusion

purifiertowerreview (25)

Dyson’s shift to smart all-in-one, connected device been a smooth one, all while staying through to what makes their known for: design, simplicity, performance and reliability.  The PCL is in every way better than the AM07, equal performance, better design and ability to be taken apart and cleaned,  there’s a HEPA filter and it’s a smart device. As a purifier it’s extremely effective at cleaning the air and clearing odors, to the point that I couldn’t imagine having a fan without the HEPA filter.  To summarize this 5000+ word review, I really really love this thing and I was really impressed. It’s one of those rare products where you really have to look hard to find something to fault. For such an elegant design, Dyson really should have used a retractable cable and there is simply no excuse for not having a rechargeable remote and we would have loved if it had backlit keys. The biggest downside is however the lack of IFTT support or compatibility with other smart devices like Amazon’s echo. In its current state the Pure Cool Link is a closed system. If Dyson manages to open the system up for IFTT support, make the cable retractable, add a rechargeable with backlit keys and use two IR receivers or an RF connection this thing would be absolutely perfect. Despite some shortcoming, I’m extremely impressed by the Dyson Pure Cool Link. It gets a 9.8 out of 10.

Pros

Beautiful design

Filter only needs to be replaced once a year and isn’t that expensive.

Performs at the same level as the AM07

The use of Dyson bladeless tech is effective and efficient in filtering the air

The unit comes apart completely and can be cleaned on the inside

Filter stops dust from collecting on the inside of the unit

Very effective at purifying the air and removing the odor

Amazing performance as a fan

Remote attached magnetically to the

The display can be dimmed

Also doubles as indoor weather station with: temperature, humidity and air quality

Cons

No IFTT support

Cord is not retractable

Remote still uses disposable batteries and needs a line of site

Suggestions

A pedestal version of the purifier

A remote that uses inductive charging while magnetically attached to the unit or USB cable

Measure Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide levels

Backlit remote

Tilt feature, especially for the desk model

Share this Article

Related Posts